Haunting and Harsh: A Summer Music Review

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Haunting and Harsh: A Summer Music Review

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/the-black-keys-turn-blue-review

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/the-black-keys-turn-blue-review

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/the-black-keys-turn-blue-review

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2014/the-black-keys-turn-blue-review

George D, Writer

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A blues/garage rock duo formed in Akron, Ohio in 2001, the Black Keys busted onto the modern scene in the 2010’s with the return to blues and garage music. Turn Blue is the Black Keys’ 8th studio record after successful 6th and 7th albums Brothers and El Camino respectively. To promote their new album, the band released two singles from Turn Blue–performing them live and then eventually put them onto iTunes for purchase–which gave the public a view of a newer, more bass oriented sound. As I listened to this album, I immediately saw a deviation from their traditional sound. From the first song the tracks are laden with synth and keyboard as opposed to the usual dry, raspy, overdriven guitar sound normally a staple of the Black Key’s sound. Turn Blue also features a more float-y and diverse sound, spanning several genres across the album. Overall, the album is comprised of what I would call ballads that incorporate haunting melodies with harsh guitar solos with a very Dark Side of the Moon (Pink Floyd) vibe. The album as a whole is a new direction for the Black Keys that–while it may not appeal to their older fans–is all in all a solid album. I give it 7 out of 10.

 

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