Trick or Treat but Where are the Children?

Trick+or+Treat
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Trick or Treat but Where are the Children?

Trick or Treat

Trick or Treat

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Trick or Treat

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Trick or Treat

Emma Sullivan, Editor-in-Chief

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Who doesn’t love Halloween? You get mountains of candy that should last you till New Years. Let’s be honest, though, that candy’s usually gone within a week. But it’s not just the sugar highs that make Halloween so much fun. You can’t forget the crazy costumes ranging from fairy princesses to those odd blow up T-Rex suits that were so last year. And frightening movies that, if you are a scaredy cat like me, only get watched at Halloween. And that house on Holden St. that decks out its front yard with gravestones and coffins. On Halloween night, homework lies forgotten as children and adults alike take to the darkened streets and break up the ghosts’ and ghouls’ otherwise quiet evening with shouts of “Trick or treat.” So, I repeat, who doesn’t love Halloween?

However, this Halloween night left me as befuddled as a skeleton wondering why the water she drank kept falling through her ribs to the floor. There were barely any trick or treaters! For me at least, trick or treating was a hallmark of my childhood. I went every year (even one time with a 101 degree fever!), but there were just not that many trick or treaters this year. Everyone around me seemed to say the same.

So, where did they all go? One probable theory is that the ghouls got them. I mean I would get annoyed too if children with odd masks and lightsabers kept shouting “Trick or treat!” However, other theories are as abundant as tootsie rolls in pillow cases on Oct 31. The tradition of “trick or treat” has hidden quite a few skeletons in the closet. There is no denying that Halloween night, a night when kids are allowed to run rampant on the streets, provides the perfect conditions for crimes ranging from violence to candy poisonings. For that reason, many towns and communities encourage “trunk or treats” (which are very lame in my opinion – part of the fun is trudging for hours until your feet go numb. Taking a few steps from one trunk to the next is a bit pathetic). Nevertheless, “trunk or treats” or Halloween parties are certainly safer Halloween options, albeit lacking in that classic spooky nostalgia. Maybe that’s it: maybe we, as people who grew up as kings and queens of the neighborhood on Halloween night, are too caught up in the nostalgia of our childhood to realize that younger kids nowadays may be alright with not ending the night with freezing toes— even if their candy has been secured in a safe way.

Maybe trick or treat is evolving. Or the ghouls and ghosts of Halloween have succeeded in scaring everyone away!

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